Annual Rite of Autumn fill Minter Creek With Hopeful Anglers

As the bite of autumn chill arrived on the Key Peninsula, anglers from Tacoma descend on a bend of Minter Creek early Thursday (Nov. 5, 2015) morning hoping to snag chum salmon. This annual rite of fall is playing out once more by the fish hatchery on Creviston Road, dozens lining up shoulder-to-shoulder with poles in hand. Their mark: chum salmon, the most abundant of all wild salmon species in Washington state.
As the bite of autumn chill arrived on the Key Peninsula, anglers from Tacoma descend on a bend of Minter Creek early Thursday morning hoping to snag chum salmon. This annual rite of fall is playing out once more by the fish hatchery on Creviston Road, dozens lining up shoulder-to-shoulder with poles in hand.
As the bite of autumn chill arrived on the Key Peninsula, anglers from Tacoma descend on a bend of Minter Creek early Thursday (Nov. 5, 2015) morning hoping to snag chum salmon. This annual rite of fall is playing out once more by the fish hatchery on Creviston Road, dozens lining up shoulder-to-shoulder with poles in hand. Their mark: chum salmon, the most abundant of all wild salmon species in Washington state.
The anglers mark: chum salmon, the most abundant of all wild salmon species in Washington state.

As the bite of autumn chill arrives on the Key Peninsula, anglers from Tacoma descend on a bend of Minter Creek early Thursday morning hoping to snag chum salmon.

This annual rite of fall is playing out once more by the fish hatchery, dozens lining up shoulder-to-shoulder with poles in hand. Their mark: chum salmon, the most abundant of all wild salmon species in Washington state.

Bob Felizardo wades knee-deep in the clear creek, stops and points at slithering shadows of salmon on the edge of the bank swimming beneath alders and maples.

“I don’t even like salmon,” Felizardo said.

“It just doesn’t taste as good as tilapia and other saltwater white fish I’m used to,” said the stocky Filipino from north Tacoma.

Yet, there he was with a dozen anglers trying their luck in this meandering waterway, about an hour from Tacoma.

“You fish?” Felizardo asked.

No, sir, I do not.

“How about that, a Filipino who doesn’t fish.”

Thank you Bob.

Good morning Longbranch.

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