Schooner ‘Adventuress’ in Longbranch on Exploration Sail

Under a blue leaden sky, the 133-foot schooner "Adventuress" sits on Filucy Bay in Longbranch this morning.
Under a blue leaden sky, the 133-foot schooner “Adventuress” anchors on Filucy Bay in Longbranch this morning.
The ship arrived in Longbranch yesterday afternoon bathed in autumn light. Photo by Richard Hildahl
The ship arrived in Longbranch yesterday afternoon bathed in autumn light. Photo by Richard Hildahl
Seeing the gaff-rigged schooner “Adventuress” on Filucy Bay this morning was such a treat.

The 133-foot ship’s white wooden hull was in bright contrast to the blue leaden skies of Longbranch, as seagulls skimmed the flat water of the bay and the splashing of seals could be heard from a distant buoy.

“She came in late (yesterday) afternoon,” reports Richard Hildahl from his deck overlooking the bay. “Just in time to be bathed by the fall sunlight.”

The Adventuress is a regular visitor to Longbranch and a spectacular sight from our shores.

The elegant vessel is in Longbranch on a Sound Explorations sail.
The elegant vessel is in Longbranch on a Sound Explorations sail.
Sound Experience, a non-profit out of Port Townsend, Wash., owns the elegant ship and uses it as a classroom at sea for schoolchildren around the Puget Sound. Its website says the group was founded in 1988 to help protect the Puget Sound through education and awareness. She is also a floating monument to a sailing past so entwined with West Coast maritime history.

According to its website, the ship is on a Sound Explorations sail and will probably pull anchor later this afternoon.

The ship itself was built in 1913 as a luxury schooner by John Borden II of Chicago, founder of the Yellow Cab Company. A year later, Borden sold the ship to the San Francisco Bar Pilot’s Association where it was “de-rigged for a work boat.” The vessel’s life of luxury had come to an abrupt end.

The next 35 years meant plying the treacherous waters of the Farallon Islands, a group of islands 30 miles off the coast of San Francisco, Calif., as a pilot . By the 1950s she had been replaced by sturdier and more modern vessels. Ten years later, she finds her way to Seattle.

The Adventuress has a full-time crew of 13 and an army of volunteers who help any way they can while the ship is docked or at sea.

Read related story here: http://wp.me/p37rAm-VR.

The Adventuress will be pulling anchor later today.
The Adventuress will be pulling anchor later today.

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