‘Dreamy’ morning, Custer’s last stand, ‘All You Need Is Love’

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My lovely bride thinks “it is dreamy” when the fog rolls across Anderson island on Drayton’s Passage.
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It was calm and wet on our bank this morning.

“I love it when the fog rolls across Anderson Island,” said my lovely bride. “It is so dreamy.”

And so it was this morning: balmy, wet and calm along Drayton’s Passage.

Good morning Longbranch.

I give you the day in history:

This day in 1876, Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer and 600 of his men were killed by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians during the Battle of Little Big Horn. The U.S. Seventh Cavalry, led by Custer, were attacked by 3,000 native American Indians led by Crazy Horse, within one hour of the attack every last one of the soldiers were dead.

Here is how pbs.org characterize Custer: “Flamboyant in life, George Armstrong Custer has remained one of the best-known figures in American history and popular mythology long after his death at the hands of Lakota and Cheyenne warriors at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

“Custer was born in New Rumley, Ohio, and spent much of his childhood with a half-sister in Monroe, Michigan. Immediately after high school he enrolled in West Point, where he utterly failed to distinguish himself in any positive way. Several days after graduating last in his class, he failed in his duty as officer of the guard to stop a fight between two cadets. He was court-martialed and saved from punishment only by the huge need for officers with the outbreak of the Civil War.

“Custer did unexpectedly well in the Civil War. He fought in the First Battle of Bull Run, and served with panache and distinction in the Virginia and Gettysburg campaigns. Although his units suffered enormously high casualty rates — even by the standards of the bloody Civil War — his fearless aggression in battle earned him the respect of his commanding generals and increasingly put him in the public eye.”

If you’ve ever wondered when the minimum wage was established, it was on this day in 1938. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Fair Labor Standards Act, establishing a minimum wage for American workers. In nominal terms, the first minimum wage, in 1938, was 25 cents an hour — equivalent to about $4.10 in 2013 dollars.

In 1967, the Beatles record their album “All You Need Is Love” in front of an international television audience on “Our World,” the first live global television link — broadcast to 26 countries and watched by an estimated 350 million people.

The following year, Bobby Bonds, 22, debuts in the major leagues with the San Francisco Giants, hitting a grand-slam home run. He was the first player to debut with a grand-slam. He was a career .286 hitter and the first player to hit 30 home runs and steal 30 bases in a season. More famously, he is the father of Barry Bonds. He played his final game on Oct. 4, 1981, at age 35. He died Aug. 23, 2003. He was 57.

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